Fantasie-Impromptu by Chopin

History of the Composition

Frédéric Chopin was born on March 1st, 1810 in Poland, and died on October 17th, 1849. He composed the Fantasie Impromptu in 1834.

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Personal Note

I first heard this piece in the late 80’s. I was downstairs, just about to go to bed, when I heard this amazing, enthralling piece being played on the radio upstairs. I immediately ran upstairs and asked my parents, “What is this piece?!” It was the Fantasie Impromptu. Well, it was love at first hearing! Wow! It is not only amazingly beautiful, but it is also brilliant, enormously engaging, and a challenge to play. I love it!

The middle section was used as a melody to a song called “I’m always Chasing Rainbows”. When I heard that tidbit of information, I really knew this was my favourite song! Ha. I call it my theme song, always chasing adventures and new horizons, always chasing rainbows.

Enjoy!

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Three Preludes by George Gershwin

History of the Composition

George Gershwin was born in Brooklyn NewYork on September 26th, 1898. He is one of the most significant and popular American composers of all time, having composed many songs as well as piano pieces. Gershwin died on July 11th, 1937.

Three Preludes was first performed by George Gershwin at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City in 1926. It is a collection of three short pieces which displays Gershwin’s flare and creativity as a composer.

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Personal Note

When I first heard these preludes for piano, I was awe struck and knew I had to play them!  The Three Preludes collection is a beautiful jazzy piece, which is technically challenging, and showy as well.

Enjoy!

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The Flashy Solfeggietto by C.P.E. Bach

Solfeggietto is a beautiful short piece composed by C.P.E. (Carl Philipp Emanuel) Bach in 1766.

History of the Composition

C.P.E. Bach was born on March 8th, 1714, and died on December 14th, 1788. He was the son of J.S. Bach. What I find interesting about C.P.E. Bach is that his compositions were a transition between J.S. Bach’s Baroque style, and the Classical style that followed it. This is very evident in his piece Solfeggietto.

More about the composition.

Personal Note

The reason I enjoy playing this piece is because it is fun to play! The piece seems to just roll off one’s fingers onto the piano because of its logical form and triadic sequences. With its fast tempo and flowing melody line, Solfeggietto creates a flashy and energetic performance piece. Enjoy!